OLYMPIA ARTS WALK XLIII – Friday, October 7 & Saturday, october…

first_imgThe Arts Walk map cover this fall is by Janice Arnold.  With recent exhibitions at the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum (2009), the Grand Rapids Art Museum (2010) and the Bellevue Arts Museum (2011), Janice is an Olympia artist who is perhaps better known outside our community.  Her chosen material is felt: “Felt means both the creation and the process, the making of strong non-woven material from nothing more than raw wool fibre. It is believed that people have been making felt for over 9000 years. In my practice, I am translating this ancient traditional process with a modern aesthetic.”While Janice is well known for her large-scale textiles, and installations suspending multiple yards of hand-made felt in the form of tents and yurts, “FELT Window #1” is a more figural work inspired by medieval stained glass. The process she uses marries richly hued wool fibers while incorporating silk and metal fabrics, using only hot water and agitation of the fibers.  During Arts Walk, Janice is creating a special installation, incorporating over 1500 square feet of handmade felt at the YOGA Loft, #9 on the Arts Walk map. City of Olympia:                                                                                                            Mark your calendar for Arts Walk XLIII! On Friday, October 7th, from 5-10pm, and Saturday, October 8th from 11am-4pm, downtown businesses will open their doors to showcase the wonderfully rich and diverse resource of visual and performing arts of the South Sound Region.  Enjoy an evening of drawings, paintings, prints, sculpture, ceramics, photography, fibers and other visual art. Take in diverse performing arts, from aerial performance to a variety of musical styles and dance from bachata to flamenco, performances and lessons!  Consult the Butohracle!  Check out spontaneous interpretive poetry and movement!  Whatever art form moves you, chances are, you’ll find it downtown during Arts Walk.  Arts Walk maps will available at participating locations and at The Olympia Center, 222 Columbia St. NW, after September 24 and an online listing can be found at www.artswalkolympia.com (also after September 24). Facebook0Tweet0Pin0FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE For youth and families, the City of Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation Department will sponsor a hands-on activity area with the Hands on Children’s Museum.  Stop by Friday, October 7, at Washington Street and 5th Avenue between 5-9pm to get your face painted and create art! Arts Walk is sponsored by the City of Olympia Parks, Arts & Recreation Department and the Olympia Arts Commission, with support provided by Art House Designs, Capitol City Press, Comcast, Heritage Bank and Mixx 96 FM.  For more information, please contact Stephanie Johnson, Arts & Events Manager, at 360.709.2678 or sjohnso1@ci.olympia.wa.us.last_img read more

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Chris Woods to Lead Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County…

first_imgFacebook588Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County (BGCTC) announced long-serving Thurston County educator and school administrator, Chris Woods, as its Chief Executive Officer. Woods’ selection came following an extensive national search. Most recently, he served as Assistant Superintendent for the Tumwater School District and brings to BGCTC a long history of commitment to youth and community collaboration through his experiences as teacher, principal, coach, and administrator.Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County announced long-serving Thurston County educator and school administrator, Chris Woods, as its Chief Executive Officer. Photo courtesy: Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County“Chris has been an effective and dedicated educator and leader in Thurston County for decades,” said Whitney Holm, BGCTC Board President. “His commitment to youth and experience developing community and school partnerships are strengths that made him the ideal candidate to lead our organization and advance our mission to help youth realize their greatness.”While serving the Tumwater School District, Woods led the transition process moving the 6th grade program from six elementary schools to two middle schools. The process included navigating a transition plan that honored the needs and involvement of those impacted while providing extensive communications and timely information to all involved, including students. Other achievements in this position include:Refining the process for school improvement planning.Improving district-wide professional development.Expanding summer school programming.Building on BGCTC’s most recent successes, Woods will continue increasing program quality, advocating for youth development, and working to reach more youth. Woods assumes this new role on April 8, 2019.Raised in Thurston County, his commitment to youth and the community are evident in his having attended Olympia schools as well as 20+ years of experience and expertise serving youth of all ages and grade levels. He has also served as a board member for the Briggs YMCA and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Western Washington; a coach with Thurston County Youth Football League, South Sound Baseball, and the YMCA; and a volunteer with Greater Olympia Young Life and West Olympia Rotary.Chris and his wife Julie, a teacher with the Olympia School District, have three children. Their oldest son, Conner, attends Grand Canyon University; their son Tyler is a junior in high school; and their daughter, Hadley, is in 8th grade.last_img read more

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The Delightful Buzz of Summer: Dr. Ankeney of Kasier Permanente Talks…

first_imgFacebook5Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Geoffrey Ankeney, MD, Kaiser Permanente Olympia Medical CenterThe sun has finally decided to grace Thurston County, which means it’s actually summer. Everyone is getting in on the fun! Unfortunately, ‘everyone’ includes bugs.The most annoying of these summer friends is mosquitoes. The name derives from Spanish for “little fly.” And they are, technically, just flies. They’re also parasites that are particularly well-adapted to sucking blood from their hosts. In fact, the prestigious journal Nature published an opinion stating that mosquitoes are good at nothing else in nature with the singular exception of acquiring blood from other organisms.It’s only the female that sucks blood; the males are happy with nectars and other plant juices. And nobody’s safe: mosquitoes will suck the blood of all kinds of mammals, birds, reptiles, even some fish. In all cases, the amount of blood taken causes no harm to the host. The problem is that the insect needs to inject saliva, filled with proteins, to successfully steal the blood.You may be wondering, “Why do you gotta spit on me when you’re ALSO stealing my blood?” The answer gets back to the Nature article, which pointed out that mosquitoes are REALLY good at this. Female mosquito saliva has a protein that inhibits blood clotting, another that inhibits platelets, and one that causes vasodilation, or dilating the veins. One thing the proteins in mosquito saliva do NOT stop, unfortunately, is release of histamine from activated mast cells, which then cause the itchy bumps on the skin.Here’s a fun fact: there’s a name for that skin reaction: “Skeeter Syndrome.” No joke. You can even find it in the medical literature. But skeeter syndrome isn’t the real problem with mosquitoes, it’s the diseases that can be carried in that nasty saliva the bug injects into our blood stream. Everything from Malaria, to yellow fever, Chikungunya, West Nile, dengue, filariasis to Zika, they all end up in our bodies thanks to mosquitoes.You might think these don’t apply to our fine yards here in Washington, but don’t be too sure. There are over 40 different mosquito species in this state, and diseases have been found in them including West Nile virus, western equine encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis. There are only two kinds of mosquitoes that carry Zika, and a similar number carry malaria, and none of them are found in Washington, thankfully. Yet. But they can always show up.So how do we protect ourselves from this great menace to urban society? We could go with Lewis and Clark’s approach on their trek to the Northwest, and smear ourselves with hog lard (not kidding, look it up). And some people suffer more than others. It’s true that mosquitoes are mini-hematologists, which means they like Type O blood more than the others. Heavy breathing also attracts the bugs, because they can sense carbon dioxide in the air, as well as skin bacteria because mosquitoes are highly sensitive to odors from perspiration. There are 72 odor receptors on mosquito antennaes, and 27 of them are devoted to detecting sweat chemicals.So aside from avoiding exercise so as to keep your breathing to a bare minimum (advice no physician should give), you’re left with bug spray as your main line of defense. There are other implements, like ultrasonic devices, citronella torches and others that may be useful, but have never been proven to work. Same for a long list of natural repellents like wormwood, sagewort, lemon balm, lemon grass, peppermint, cedar oil, camphor, tea tree oil and many, many more. Some may work, many do not, none have conclusive evidence that they work.The synthetic repellents tend to work better, with the chemical DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) leading the way. It has been proven to be effective, though it doesn’t last as long as most people think. It needs to be reapplied about every 2-3 hours to work. You can also use a chemical called permethrin on clothing, gear and bed nets. DEET probably isn’t the greatest chemical to have in your system, which is why most authorities recommend the spray formulation instead of the creams that you rub into your skin. DEET in general doesn’t appear to be dangerous, though it has been associated with minor adverse effects in outdoor workers who used it daily for long durations.Therefore, given the risks of everything from “Skeeter Syndrome” to Zika, currently the best bet for enjoying summer evenings in the Great Pacific Northwest is to use a good insect repellent spray containing DEET. One day, Science Magazine may lead the charge to totally eradicate mosquitoes from the face of planet earth. Until then, these “little flies” will be enjoying summer right there with us.last_img read more

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Matthew Guile Joins Greene Realty Group

first_imgFacebook15Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Greene Realty GroupMatthew Guile has recently become a Realtor for Greene Realty Group – Greene Realty Group, 1722 Harrison Avenue NW, Olympia, WA 98502.Matt was the Marketing Director at Greene Realty Group for 4 years, before transitioning into a full time Realtor. His time working with the agents has helped him gain a unique perspective on local Real Estate, and with 15 years of both professional and creative endeavors, Matt is ready to take on real estate with an energetic drive. He is a local through and through and values the community unlike any other, as he works with numerous local groups and organizations throughout Thurston County.Greene Realty Group is a real estate organization filled with talented, knowledgeable full-time professionals who stand by their clients, colleagues and the community with integrity and thoughtfulness for the unique needs and best interests of each.Mathew Guile360.239.6510mattguile@greenerealty.comlast_img read more

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Vikram Rathour asks Rishabh Pant to be more careful; favours Rohit Sharma as a…

first_imgAdvertisement c7mfNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsa3jj45Wingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E3rgjit( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) bWould you ever consider trying this?😱3xfCan your students do this? 🌚hxRoller skating! Powered by Firework Rishabh Pant needs to differentiate between being fearless and being careless said the Indian cricket team’s newly-appointed batting coach Vikram Rathour, two days after head coach Ravi Shastri disapproved of his “rash stroke selection” in crucial situations. The batting coach has also backed Rohit Sharma to open for India in tests at home and abroad in a press conference on the eve of India’s second T20I match against South Africa in Mohali.Advertisement Since his debut two and a half years ago, the highly rated Pant hasn’t justified his potential yet. He has a T20I average of just 21.57 and before his unbeaten 65 in the final game of the series against West Indies, Pant was dismissed for 3, 1 (against Australia) and 0 and 4 (against the West Indies). The youngster has already been labelled as a match-winner, but his tendency to slog from the very first ball has been criticized by Ravi Shastri and now Rathour. The batting coach feels that the youngster needs to understand the difference between fearless cricket and careless cricket.Advertisement “All young cricketers need to understand the difference between fearless cricket and careless cricket. The team wants everyone to play without fear. We want Rishabh to play all his shots as it makes him special. But you do not want any batsman to be careless and reckless,” he said.Rathour then supported Rohit Sharma’s inclusion in the squad as a test opener saying, “I think he is too good a player to not be playing in any team. Everybody in the side echoes this opinion. He is a wonderful opening batsman in the limited-overs format, so there is no reason why he cannot be successful in Test matches. If he gets his game-plan right, he can be a great asset to the team. ”Advertisement   Advertisementlast_img read more

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Surviving The Smog: Bangladesh coach making light of Delhi air pollution “No one will…

first_imgImage Courtesy: Hindustan TimesAdvertisement Bangladesh head coach Russell Domingo downplayed the threat posed by the smog that is looming the capital city of Delhi over the past few days.Advertisement Domingo along with spin consultant Daniel Vettori and bowler Al-Amin were seen wearing masks during the training session at the Arun Jaitley stadium. Batsman Liton Das was seen wearing one as well, but later on, clarified that it was because of a personal health issue and not because of the pollution.Image Courtesy: Hindustan TimesThe head coach claimed that the poor air quality was not a surprise as the situation is similar back in Bangladesh as well. He added that it is just a matter of three hours and there would be no dire consequences coming out of it. He stated:Advertisement “It’s only three hours so it’s going to be easy. There maybe scratchy eyes, sore throat but that’s okay. No one is dying.”Domingo concluded by saying that the conditions would prove to be difficult for both the teams and the game must continue without any complaints.Advertisement As far as any threat of the game being cancelled, BCCI president Sourav Ganguly has made it clear that the match will go on as planned. The former Indian captain ensured that better planning would be done in the future with throwing a subtle hint that North Indian venues won’t be considered for fixtures after Diwali.Read Also:Photo: Rohit Sharma compared Ishant Sharma with Zlatan Ibrahimovic in light hearted throwback postThrow Outta Nowhere: Unhappy Rohit Sharma opts out of session after being hit on thigh during throwdowns   Advertisementlast_img read more

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Mary Patricia Moody and Jeffrey Buckley, Jr.

first_imgMr. and Mrs. James Moody, Fair Haven, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Patricia Hannan Moody to Jeffrey David Buckley, Jr., son of Sara Henderson Buckley, Dorse, Vt. and Jeffrey D. Buckley, Media, Pa.The bride-to-be graduated from the University of New Hampshire with a B.A. in psychology. She will graduate from Western Governors University in January with a M.A. in elementary education. She is currently employed by the Red Bank Borough public schools.The groom-to-be graduated from Bentley University, Waltham, Mass. with a B.A. in business management. He is currently a market maker at Walleye Trading Advisors.A June 2013 wedding is planned at the Hildene in Manchester, Vt.last_img read more

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Shadowbrook Expansion Approved, Again

first_imgBy John BurtonSHREWSBURY – The owners’ plans to expand and renovate the venerable Shadowbrook catering facility have now been approved by the borough Zoning Board of Adjustment twice but objectors will likely look to continue to try and block the project.After a Superior Court judge had remanded the matter back to the borough to allow for an additional public hearing, the zoning board on Feb. 8 conducted another hearing and, while continuing to face opposition to the plan, again provided approval for the venue, located at 1 Obre Place.The owners of the nearly 110-year-old picturesque site on roughly 18 acres, which has been a restaurant and more recently a catering site, say they want to improve the location. Their plans call for the work to be conducted in two phases. Phase one would involve constructing a 30,014-square-foot building addition to the current structure; building off-street parking facilities to accommodate about 329 vehicles; and providing ancillary site improvements, such as renovating the kitchens and restroom facilities and other amenities. The second phase of the proposed construction would involve building an approximately 4,200-square-foot addition, according to information in the zoning board’s resolution of approval passed by the board in December 2015.The owners are a six-member group headed up by James Kourgelis of Saddlebrook. The group owns and operates The Venetian in Garfield and Seasons venues in Washington Township, also catering sites. Kourgelis and his partners have owned Shadowbrook for approximately two years. Kourgelis had explained to the zoning board two years ago that Shadowbrook needed to be upgraded and modernized from its existing state to remain competitive in the marketplace. The improvements would allow the facility to book larger events and conduct overlapping multiple events, making the site more attractive to a wider client base, according to information documented in the approval resolution.Kourgelis did not return a phone call this week seeking an interview about his plans for the location.Shadowbrook is an existing non-conforming use that sits in an area zoned for residential use and is also home to Shrewsbury Borough Elementary School. Some residents in the neighborhood raised objections to expanding a non-conforming use, fearing the added traffic and noise will have a dramatically negative impact on their quality of life.Entrance to the Shadowbrook.The board, in its resolution, requires Shadowbrook’s owners to address some of the residents’ issues, by limiting music times, hours of certain larger events, and to increase buffering landscaping.Edward J. McKenna Jr., a Red Bank lawyer representing Shadowbrook, said “We listened to the neighbors,” and conducted a series of meetings with homeowners “and adjusted our plans to take into consideration the concerns of the neighbors who appeared.”An appeal lawsuit seeking to overturn the board’s approval was brought by Spruce Drive residents Richard and Patricia Windecker. During those proceedings, the court found that the municipality failed to adequately advertise the public notice and remanded it back for another public hearing for anyone who hadn’t had the chance to get their comments on the public record. That was held earlier this month, resulting in the board reaffirming its earlier approval.center_img Attorney Ron Gasiorowski, Red Bank, representing the Windeckers, said this week this is not the last word on the matter or the last time it’ll be in a courtroom.“I’ve been doing this for a long time,” said Gasiorowski, a veteran New Jersey land use lawyer, who specializes in representing objectors to development projects. “I have great sympathy for the plight of those homeowners,” meaning both the Windeckers and their neighbors. “These people believe in me and I believe in them. I’m not walking away from this.”McKenna also noted his 40-plus years in land use law, maintaining, “I don’t take (planning) applications I don’t think are in the best interest of the town they’re going into.”And in this case, “The owners here are incredibly intelligent people who have a great interest in this particular facility in the borough of Shrewsbury.”McKenna went on to say about the project, “I thought it was one of the most incredibly well thought out plans I’ve ever seen.”Objectors have 45 business days to file an appeal in Superior Court.The original Georgian mansion that is Shadowbrook’s main structure was built in 1907, serving as the summer home of the socially prominent Feinstock family. In 1942, the location was sold and began its life as a restaurant. It was then sold to the Zwebin family in the 1971, who first ran it as a restaurant and eventually converted it to a catering business until selling it in 2015.last_img read more

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Wildcats ride home crowd all the way to bronze medal at A-Girls Volleyball Championships

first_imgMount Sentinel maintained its slim margin before putting the icing on the cake when Chernoff hammered home a kill after Carr’s quick set.The play sent the home supporters into a frenzy.“Our serving and our passing and keeping the ball off the net because (White Rock) has some tall players we had to deal with,” Carr said when asked about the keys to winning the match.The win was some payback for the Cats after losing to White Rock during the round robin draw Thursday at the LVR Hangar in Nelson.The loss forced the Cats, finishing second in the division, to take an alternate route to the playoff round.Mount Sentinel defeated Fernie Falcons before dumping Cedar Christian of Prince George Friday. The Wildcats won each match 3-0.In semi final play Saturday, the Cats lost 3-0 to Kelowna Christian.“I feel like this was a redemption game . . . it was a little bit of payback because we didn’t play very well the first time we played White Rock,” Carr explained.“We weren’t playing very well (Thursday) and it was kind of like we needed to lose . . .. It was better off to lose earlier in the tournament.”Selkirk Storm of Kimberley finished sixth while Fernie Falcons took home 11th spot. Salmo Falcons finished 16th after losing to Glynlyon Norfolk of Vancouver Island.The championships mark the ninth time the South Slocan-based school has been the feature site of the provincial tournament since 1991.Mount Sentinel has won four titles since 1997, the last coming in 2007. All season the Mount Sentinel Wildcats sat third in the B.C. High School A Girl’s Volleyball top ten poll.The pollsters must have done their homework as the Cats rode home crowd support en route to a 2-0 win over White Rock Christian in the bronze medal match at the B.C. High School A Girl’s Volleyball Championships Saturday at the Selkirk College Gymnasium in Castlegar.“We wanted to play well in this tournament and I’m really proud of everyone,” said Mount Sentinel captain Lynnea Carr minutes after the Cats defeated White Rock Christian to finish third overall in the 16-team tournament.“Third is a great way to end and I’m definitely happy. Winning bronze is a great way to end my high school career.”Kelowna Christian Knights from the Central Okanagan swept crosstown rival Immaculata Mustangs 3-0 to repeat at provincial champions.Kelowna Christian did not lose a match throughout the entire tournament, winning the 2012 crown 25-10, 25-22, 25-21.The Wildcats won the best-of-three match 25-21, 25-19 and received contribution from every player on the team.From the setting and leadership of Carr to the back row play of senior Jessie Rehwald and Grade 10 Kyra Makortoff, to the serving of Breanne Minor and Malin Chernoff and to the kills from lefty Kaitlin Minvielle and saves from Zahra Askary, the Cats put it all together in front of a boisterous home crowd.“Ya this is really exciting . . . it feels like first,” Rehwald, who joined sister Madia as the sixth sister combination to play for the varsity girl’s team at Mount Sentinel.“Everyone just played their best for us in this game.”The last sister act at Mount Sentinel, the Wayling sisters, Kendra and Katie, powered the school to its most recent provincial crown in 2007.Mount Sentinel led from start to finish in game one of the bronze final to capture the momentum in the match.In game two, White Rock took the early lead but solid serving by Chernoff rallied the Kootenay Champs back into the lead.last_img read more

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Select roll past Columbia Valley to secure berth in Les Sinnott Memorial U15 Boys Provincial Cup

first_imgThe Nelson Selects secured a berth in the Les Sinnott Memorial U15 Boys Provincial Cup by blasting Columbia Valley 5-0 in Kootenay Soccer Playoff action last week in Cranbrook.The Selects advance to the provincial tournament July 7-10 in West Vancouver.With the backline of Jesse Harold, Kiefer Barclay, Iyra Cristofoli-Couling and Brett Anderson keeping the Columbia Valley offence under control, the Nelson strikers had a field day with Moss Caney leading the attack with three goals.Josh Sookorukoff and team captain Max Spielman added singles to close out the scoring for the Selects. Midfielders Jaiah Lotus and Matthew Wouter dominated the pitch to feed many great passes through to the strikers.Keeper Ryder Marzicola was solid between the pipes to secure the clean sheet.Nelson advanced to the Kootenay Final by sweeping Kootenay South in a two-game, total goal series.The Select outlasted Kootenay South 5-4 in Nelson before thumping the West Kootenay rivals 5-0 in Trail.Coaches for the Selects are Tony Marzicola and Grant Anderson while Jodi Wouters is the manager.last_img read more

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