Quiet wind turbine could provide up to 30 of a homes power

first_imgThe Swift wind turbine, developed by the Scottish company Renewable Devices, was designed for quiet roof-top performance. Credit: Cascade Engineering. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Quiet wind turbine could provide up to 30% of a home’s power (2008, October 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-10-quiet-turbine-home-power.html Originally designed by Scotland-based Renewable Devices, the Swift wind turbine is being sold in the US by Cascade Engineering of Grand Rapids, Mich.Unlike many existing small wind turbines, the Swift turbine is designed to reduce noise. At seven feet in diameter, it consists of five thin blades encircled by a ring. The ring reduces vibration and diffuses the noise to a level of less than 35 decibels. Cascade says that the wind turbine should be positioned at least two feet above the roof line in locations with average wind. Its two fins direct the turbine to face the wind, with the ability to turn 360 degrees. The blades power a generator, which produces about 1.5 kilowatts with a 14-mph wind. Over a year, the turbine can generate about 2,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity, which is a significant percentage of the 6,500 to 10,000 kilowatt-hours per year that US households typically consume (estimates are from the US Energy Information Administration).While the installation cost run at around $10,000, state rebates and tax credits could help lower the upfront cost; for example, a renewable energy tax credit gives consumers $1,000 back for residential systems and $4,000 for commercial buildings. Depending on these incentives and performance levels, Cascade estimates that the upfront cost could be made up in as little as three years.So far, Cascade has installed nine Swift turbines in the US and has a backlog of 25 orders. Orders come from about half residential and half commercial customers. In Scotland, Swift turbines have been installed at 250 sites. More information: www.swiftwindturbine.comvia: CNet News (PhysOrg.com) — A quiet wind turbine developed in Scotland is now available in the US and Canada. Its developers say that the roof-based turbine can provide significant power for homes and commercial buildings alike. last_img read more

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Graphene transistor could advance nanodevices

first_img Citation: Graphene transistor could advance nanodevices (2010, May 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-05-graphene-transistor-advance-nanodevices.html IBM Scientists Demonstrate World’s Fastest Graphene Transistor Graphene transistor. Image credit: Peking University (PhysOrg.com) — For years, scientists and researchers have been looking into the properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for use in nanoelectronics. “There is no real mass application of devices based on graphene and carbon nanotubes,” Zhenxing Wang tells PhysOrg.com. “This is really an opportunity for them to show their capabilities.” Wang is part of a group at the Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices at Peking University in Beijing. Along with Zhiyong Zhang, Huilong Xu, Li Ding, Sheng Wang, and Lian-Mao Peng, Wang tested a top-gate graphene field-effect transistor based frequency doubler in order to gauge its performance. They were able to show that a graphene based frequency doubler can provide more than 90% converting efficiency, while the corresponding value is not larger than 30% for conventional frequency doubler. Their work is published in Applied Physics Letters: “A high-performance top-gate graphene field-effect transistor based frequency doubler.”“Our work focused on raising the gain and frequency response of the frequency doubler by utilizing top-gate geometry on the device,” Wang explains. “Only with a top-gate can people fabricate high-performance devices and integral circuits. This work paves the way to mass application of graphene transistors in the near future.”Graphene is desirable as a transistor material due to its high performance. Wang points out that IBM recently showed that graphene transistor can operate up to 100 GHz, and the group at Peking University believes that the material may even still operate well in the THz regime. “This is very exciting,” Wang says, “because a frequency doubler with high frequency and high efficiency can be very expensive. Our device is cheaper – only consisted by one transistor – but with much higher efficiency.” In Beijing, the group fabricated the device with standard lithography, layering the graphene on a silicon wafer, smaller than 1mm x 1mm. In order to test the performance, Wang and his colleagues used a digital oscilloscope. They also used a recent test method, developed at Peking University, to measure performance of the graphene doubler. “We developed a new test method with a spectrum analyzer, which can obtain direct frequency information and sense a much smaller signal that can’t be obtained by oscilloscope.”Moving forward, this work could lead to the development of graphene transistors for nanoelectronics. “In principle, this kind of device can be realized on a wafer scale, based on current lithography technology and wafer-scale graphene growth. Mass production can be realized once the graphene growth technology becomes mature,” Wang explains. “We are looking forward to the mass production of a graphene based frequency doubler with frequency response up to 100 GHz, gain larger than 1/10, and with low cost and low power consumption.”This future, though, could still be five to 10 years away, and Wang is not overly concerned about the mass production end of it just yet. “I’m now focusing on improving the performance of the device in demonstration in order to show its potential. Possible optimization can be made through such means as replacing the substrate with insulating materials to reduce the parasitic capacitance.” At some point, though, graphene transistors could help advance the development of nanoscale electronics, and the work done by the scientists at Peking University are providing a step in that direction. Explore further Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. More information: Zhenxing Wang, et. al., “A high-performance top-gate graphene field-effect transistor based frequency doubler,” Applied Physics Letters (2010). Available online: link.aip.org/link/APPLAB/v96/i17/p173104/s1 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Team develops most sensitive scale ever

first_img © 2012 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — A Spanish research team in Barcelona working out of the Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, has succeeded in building the most sensitive scale ever created. It’s capable, as the team describes in their paper published in Nature Nanotechnology, of weighing a single proton. Citation: Team develops most sensitive scale ever (2012, April 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-team-sensitive-scale.html Journal information: Nature Nanotechnology Explore further More information: A nanomechanical mass sensor with yoctogram resolution, Nature Nanotechnology (2012) doi:10.1038/nnano.2012.42AbstractNanomechanical resonators have been used to weigh cells, biomolecules and gas molecules, and to study basic phenomena in surface science, such as phase transitions and diffusion. These experiments all rely on the ability of nanomechanical mass sensors to resolve small masses. Here, we report mass sensing experiments with a resolution of 1.7 yg (1 yg = 10−24 g), which corresponds to the mass of one proton. The resonator is a carbon nanotube of length ~150 nm that vibrates at a frequency of almost 2 GHz. This unprecedented level of sensitivity allows us to detect adsorption events of naphthalene molecules (C10H8), and to measure the binding energy of a xenon atom on the nanotube surface. These ultrasensitive nanotube resonators could have applications in mass spectrometry, magnetometry and surface science. For most of civilized human history, people have been weighing things, all the while trying to improve on their ability to do so. Something’s mass quite often leads to its value, and modern scales are no different. A scale that can weigh not just atoms, but their parts, could be useful as a tool to help researchers distinguish between minute quantities of different materials, or medical researches looking to find differences between very similar molecules.The team achieved their feat by using a short carbon nanotube (~150 nm) that vibrates at a frequency of just under 2 GHz, working as a nanomechanical resonator. Measurements are made by noting changes in vibrations when objects are placed on it. By using a shorter than normal nanotube, the team was able to achieve better resolution than with current scales and found it could be used at lower temperatures as well. In their test, they weighed a xenon atom (in a vacuum) to the nearest 10-24 grams (one septillionth of a gram) or one yoctogram, after first heating the nanotube to remove any other atoms that might have been present. In so doing, they found they were able to weigh one single proton (1.7 yoctograms), a truly astounding achievement. The previous best mass sensitivity measurement was a whopping 100 yoctograms.The researchers suggest that the scale could be used for surface science, magnetometry and mass spectrometry applications to weigh cells, gas molecules and biomolecules.Unfortunately, while building a scale with such sensitivity is truly remarkable, there remains one more hurdle. As with any scale, its usefulness only becomes apparent when it becomes available to others. Thus, a way to create a process whereby such a scale could be produced in sufficient quantity at a reasonable cost still needs to be worked out. Once that happens though, it’s likely this new scale will become an important research tool in labs across the world. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Researchers create the first thermal nanomotor in the worldlast_img read more

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EUROnu project recommends building Neutrino Factory

first_img More information: hepunx.rl.ac.uk/uknf/www.nu.to.infn.it/Neutrino_Factory/ Citation: EUROnu project recommends building Neutrino Factory (2013, June 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-euronu-neutrino-factory.html Explore further Rare find backs shape-shifting neutrino Members of the EUROnu project had winnowed down the options to just three: the Neutrino Factory, Super Beam and Beta Beam. The Neutrino Factory option was the most costly—EUROnu projects its construction would cost between €4.6 billion and €6.5 billion.In contrast to the Large Hadron Collider—its mission is to investigate the nature of gravity by looking at matters most basic particles—the Neutrino Factory would be a facility in which researchers seek to understand why matter exists in the first place. Specifically, it would help scientists understand why there are not equal amounts of matter and antimatter. Another question is, since matter and antimatter annihilate one another on contact, how was it the universe was able to form at all? EUROnu project members believe the Neutrino Factory would be the best way to find such answers.Currently, the best approach to do so appears to lie with studying neutrinos. The idea with the Neutrino Factory is to create neutrinos—by firing protons into an unmoving target, resulting in muons which in turn decay into neutrinos. Sending the neutrinos some distance and then studying how they’ve changed during transit, researchers believe, would help to better understand how they work. Noting changes in the proportions of the types of neutrinos sent, for example, could help scientists gain a deeper understanding of antimatter. To make that happen, the Neutrino Factory would actually have two main components. The first would be an emitter station to create the neutrinos and send them. The second would be a receiving station some distance away. Since neutrinos can travel through matter in a straight line, the Neutrino Factory would shoot them down through the Earth, where they would be picked up by the receiving station—from Switzerland to Japan for example.The recommendation by EUROnu is just the first step in the development of the new project, of course, and there is no guarantee that it will ever be built at all. It’s up to the EU to decide. The project could also be changed to reduce costs or phased in to spread the cost over more years.center_img © 2013 Phys.org (Phys.org) —The European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme, EUROnu, has submitted its findings to a panel at CERN. Charged with choosing a project to study the nature of matter and antimatter, the project members have chosen one called the Neutrino Factory. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Research paper publishing sting reveals lax standards of many openaccess journals

first_imgPeer review reviewed. Few journals did substantial review that identified the paper’s flaws. Credit: ‘Who’s Afraid of Peer Review?’ by John Bohannon, Science 4 October 2013: Vol. 342 no. 6154 pp. 60-65 DOI: 10.1126/science.342.6154.60 © 2013 Phys.org More information: ‘Who’s Afraid of Peer Review?’ by John Bohannon, Science 4 October 2013: Vol. 342 no. 6154 pp. 60-65 DOI: 10.1126/science.342.6154.60See also: Flawed sting operation singles out open access journals Explore further (Phys.org) —John Bohannon, contributing news correspondent for Science, the highly respected peer-reviewed journal has conducted what he calls a “sting operation” that reveals problems with open-access publishing journals. The results of his operation have been published in a Science News piece. Citation: Research paper publishing sting reveals lax standards of many open-access journals (2013, October 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-paper-publishing-reveals-lax-standards.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Science University of California adopts open-access policy for research papers This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Over the past several years, a debate has arisen in the academic and research community. Should papers written by researchers be published as open-access (free for readers) or behind closed pay-walls? Some suggest papers written by researchers that use public funds should always be available for anyone to read without having to pay. Others insist that the only way to ensure quality and integrity is to have well respected journals accept only those papers worthy of publication and then to vet them via a peer review process. In his sting operation, Bohannon offers evidence of major flaws in the open-access publishing system.The overall purpose of his sting operation was to reveal whether open-access journals were truly peer-reviewing articles as they were claiming. To find out, he wrote a bogus research paper in which he claimed to have found a lichen-based wonder drug that showed cancer fighting capabilities. But, he of course didn’t do any research, instead he made everything up. As part of doing so, he wrote his paper in a way that was certain to be rejected by any real peer-review process—it was full of technical errors, and even went so far as to suggest bypassing clinical trials. Bohannon even had the paper reviewed by some experts in the field to ensure that the errors he introduced were so blatant that no respected peer group could miss them. Once the paper was ready, he used a computer program to create hundreds of slightly different versions of the paper (with different author names, etc.) and then sent them to 304 open-access journals asking for the paper to be considered for publishing. Sadly, nearly half of the targets accepted the bogus paper indicating that they had not peer-reviewed the paper or their reviewers were very low quality. In all he reports that 157 journals accepted the paper while 98 rejected it outright and only 36 responded back to him with comments suggesting they had actually read what he’d sent them. Furthermore he found that many of the journals that presented themselves as western based, were actually operating in India and other eastern countries.Bohannon doesn’t offer any real analysis of his sting operation, preferring apparently to let the results stand on their own with the clear implication that because of unscrupulous operators, open-source publishing is seriously flawed and in many cases should not be taken seriously by those wishing to publish research papers.last_img read more

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Study suggests global warming causing changes to the pitch of frog calls

first_img Narins and a group of students visited Puerto Rico in 1983-84 and recorded frog calls (and frog body size) along a path that led up into the mountains. At the time, Narins noted that the frog calls changed in pitch in relation to the elevation at which they lived. The higher up they lived, the bigger they got and the lower the pitch of the calls. Narins and a new group of researchers visited Puerto Rico again in 2006, and repeated the exercise, following the same path and making recordings and measuring frogs. In so doing, they report that the frog calls have changed dramatically as has their average body size.More specifically, Narins and his team found that it was the second syllable of the call that was most impacted. Prior research has shown that the first syllable is generally aimed at warding off other males, the second is directed at females. Over two decades, the second syllable has grown higher in pitch and lasts for a shorter amount of time. The team noted that some of the calls from higher elevations in 2006 were nearly identical to calls from frogs in lower elevations in 1986, suggesting a definite link between frog calls and changes in air temperature. Further analysis revealed that the amount of change in pitch could be mapped to the changes in temperature, which happened to also correlate to the actual average air temperature increase experienced by Puerto Rico over the same time span. The team also reports that average frog size has decreased as well.Frogs are cold-blooded of course, which means they are more susceptible to changes in air temperature. The problem with changes in male frog calls is that quite often it means directing them at females that are unable to respond to them, or in some cases, hear them at all. That of course could lead to rapid population decline, or possibly extinction. © 2014 Phys.org US lists tiny Puerto Rican frog as endangered Explore further (Phys.org) —A trio of researchers has published a paper in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, describing field studies conducted by lead Peter Narins and others. He and colleagues have found that the pitch of male coqui frog calls in Puerto Rico has changed over the twenty two year period between 1984 and 2006, which appears to correlate with the amount of air temperature increase the frogs have been exposed to due to global warming. More information: Climate change and frog calls: long-term correlations along a tropical altitudinal gradient, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Published 9 April 2014 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0401AbstractTemperature affects nearly all biological processes, including acoustic signal production and reception. Here, we report on advertisement calls of the Puerto Rican coqui frog (Eleutherodactylus coqui) that were recorded along an altitudinal gradient and compared these with similar recordings along the same altitudinal gradient obtained 23 years earlier. We found that over this period, at any given elevation, calls exhibited both significant increases in pitch and shortening of their duration. All of the observed differences are consistent with a shift to higher elevations for the population, a well-known strategy for adapting to a rise in ambient temperature. Using independent temperature data over the same time period, we confirm a significant increase in temperature, the magnitude of which closely predicts the observed changes in the frogs’ calls. Physiological responses to long-term temperature rises include reduction in individual body size and concomitantly, population biomass. These can have potentially dire consequences, as coqui frogs form an integral component of the food web in the Puerto Rican rainforest.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B A Common Coquí (Eleutherodactylus coqui) from Puerto Rico. Credit: United States Department of Agriculture Citation: Study suggests global warming causing changes to the pitch of frog calls in Puerto Rico (2014, April 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-global-pitch-frog-puerto-rico.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Field study shows possibility of deflecting seismic waves around desired geologic surface

first_img Citation: Field study shows possibility of deflecting seismic waves around desired geologic surface areas (2014, April 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-04-field-possibility-deflecting-seismic-desired.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2014 Phys.org The construction of tiny cloaking devices has made headlines around the world in recent years, though they are still very much in their infancy. In this new field study, the team in France sought to learn whether a similar cloaking device could be built on a much larger scale. More specifically, they wanted to know if it might be possible to cloak parts of the surface of the Earth, from destructive seismic waves, i.e. earthquakes.To find out, they noted the frequencies at which seismic waves tend to move through the ground and then devised a grid system that in theory could cause the waves to change course due to diffraction among the elements that made up the grid. To test their theory they dug an array of boreholes five meters deep (.32 meters diameter) in a section of ground to serve as the cloaking device. They then buried several sensors around and near the grid to test how well the cloak worked. Finally, a crane was used to lower a vibrating pole into a hole a meter and a half away from the grid to cause the creation of seismic waves.In analyzing data from the sensors, the researchers found that the bore-hole grid did indeed reflect a significant portion of the seismic waves, leaving the ground around them nearly unshaken. They also noted that areas next to the bore-hole grid had nearly double the amount of seismic energy—they were exposed to the initial waves from the source and also from the waves that were reflected off the grid.The experiment opens the door to the possibility of protecting populated areas from the devastation of earthquakes. Many questions must still be addressed however. First, if a massive grid were constructed to protect a city, where would the waves be sent instead. Also, there is the question of how well the idea would scale—much more work needs to be done to find the answers to such questions, though it will be a near certainty that the results by this team will cause others to join in as well. Detection of supershear rupture in 2013 Craig, Alaska, earthquake (Phys.org) —A team of researchers in France has successfully demonstrated small-scale reflection of seismic waves around a desired geological area. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers describe an experiment they conducted at an outdoor site to test whether lessons learned in creating cloaking devices using metamaterials (and other techniques) might be applied to seismic waves generated by earthquakes.center_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters (a) Scheme of the testing device for seismic metamaterials. An oscillating probe generates acoustic waves at 50 Hz in front of a mesh of cylindrical boreholes. An array of sensors monitors the intensity of the waves at various positions. (b) Experimental results. The map (black rectangles: sensors; white circles: boreholes; red cross: source) plots the difference of energy after and before drilling the boreholes. The dark blue region behind the holes indicates that the presence of the borehole mesh results in a decrease of elastic energy transmitted to that area. The red region indicates the area close to the source in which the wave intensity increases because of reflection. Credit: S. Brûlé et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2014) More information: Experiments on Seismic Metamaterials: Molding Surface Waves, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 133901 – Published 31 March 2014, dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.133901ABSTRACTMaterials engineered at the micro- and nanometer scales have had a tremendous and lasting impact in photonics and phononics. At much larger scales, natural soils civil engineered at decimeter to meter scales may interact with seismic waves when the global properties of the medium are modified, or alternatively thanks to a seismic metamaterial constituted of a mesh of vertical empty inclusions bored in the initial soil. Here, we show the experimental results of a seismic test carried out using seismic waves generated by a monochromatic vibrocompaction probe. Measurements of the particles’ velocities show a modification of the seismic energy distribution in the presence of the metamaterial in agreement with numerical simulations using an approximate plate model. For complex natural materials such as soils, this large-scale experiment was needed to show the practical feasibility of seismic metamaterials and to stress their importance for applications in civil engineering. We anticipate this experiment to be a starting point for smart devices for anthropic and natural vibrations. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Its Not Your Salary That Counts – Its How You Spend It

first_imgOverall, the results provide a strong indication that a big paycheck alone will not guarantee you’ll feel better about your life. Once your salary hits a certain level, you may find diminishing returns for your sense of well-being. You may be constantly striving for that big raise, hoping that a salary crossing the six-figure mark will magnify your sense of contentment and security. But the salary itself may not be the formula for being high on life; what you do with the money may play an even stronger role, a psychological study indicates. Brown, G.D.A., Gathergood, J. (2019). Consumption changes, not income changes, predict changes in subjective well-being. Social Psychological and Personality Science, doi.org/10.1177/1948550619835215Lee, J.C., Hall, D.L., Wood, W. (2018). Experiential or material purchases? Social class determines purchase happiness. Psychological Science, 29(7), 1031–1039. doi.org/10.1177/0956797617736386.Matz, S. C., Gladstone, J. J., & Stillwell, D. (2016). Money buys happiness when spending fits our personality. Psychological Science, 27(5), 715–725. doi.org/10.1177/0956797616635200 Those conclusions expand on other recent findings about purchases and subjective well-being. Scientists from the University of Cambridge concluded from their 2016 study that people who spend money on purchases that mesh with their personality traits—as measured in a standardized psychological tests—report being more satisfied with their lives. What’s more, the researchers found that this effect was stronger than that of total spending and income. (Critics of the study, however, say the spending effects on well-being are too minimal to significantly affect people’s lives.) Brown and Gathergood also tried to identify the types of consumption that might boost life satisfaction. Previous research has suggested that consumers glean more happiness from experiential purchases such as vacations and theater performances than they do from buying material goods like home furnishings, clothing, or consumer electronics. Brown and Gathergood looked for this experiential advantage in their own analysis, as well, but found no evidence that either type of spending yielded differing effects on life satisfaction. Scientists have long examined the link between people’s income and their sentiments about their own lives, often referred to as subjective well-being. Over the last decade, researchers have pegged the minimum annual income for happiness as anywhere between $50,000 and $100,000, with higher amounts having no discernible effect on happiness. Studies have also made various attempts to distinguish day-to-day emotional well-being from overall life satisfaction—the latter of which could include, for example, your feelings about the direction your career or marriage is heading. center_img Their analysis of the data indicated that changes in consumption, not income, correlated with changes in life satisfaction. The researchers also found evidence that increased conspicuous consumption (e.g., spending on clothes, vacations, hobbies) had the strongest effect. But two social scientists in the United Kingdom recently began questioning those findings and conclusions. Psychological scientist Gordon D.A. Brown of the University of Warwick and economist John Gathergood of the University of Nottingham suspected that the previous research largely ignored consumption patterns, even though household spending doesn’t always correspond with household income. A family spending lots of money at the supermarket may be living on food stamps, for example, while a highly- paid executive will save a substantial amount of income instead of spending it. Moreover, a household income of $100,000 provides a lot more comfort in lower-cost cities like Milwaukee than it does in Manhattan. Other studies have uncovered some nuance to that so-called experiential advantage. A 2018 study, for example, found that while people with more wealth were indeed happier with buying experiences versus tangible goods, people with lower incomes reported as much as or even more happiness from material purchases compared with experiential buys. References To examine how consumption mixes with income to drive life satisfaction, Brown and Gathergood turned to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), a massive survey of US households that includes complete data on consumption, broken down by categories. The PSID includes participants’ reports on their own sense of satisfaction with life over time. Brown and Gathergood considered households in the top 1% and bottom 1% income brackets to be outliers and excluded them from their final data sample. They ended up with a pool of 5,660 individuals, more than 70% of whom were men. The participants’ average age was 46. Half were married or partnered, two-thirds had at least a high school education, and slightly more than 60% owned their home. last_img read more

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Gearing up for the big band battle

first_imgOver the last three weeks, twelve bands have played live, battled it out for audience attention and votes and now it has all come down to the three finalists – The Alibi, Pilgrim and Tarik.Over the last three weeks, India’s first ever indie Battle of the Bands has been taking place at Café 27. Sixty bands entered the competition, twelve performed in the heats, and now only three remain.They’ll all be performing on 27 April in the grand finale of Delhi Indie Night: Battle of the Bands. To find out who will be crowned champion, come along, the first band will be playing at 9 pm. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Once all three bands have played, you’ll get the chance to vote for the one you think is the best, and be a part of deciding who becomes the overall winner.On Saturday, each of the bands will be playing a 40-minute set, after which the audience will vote for their favourite. That very night, the overall winner will be announced, and they will take away prizes that include a one hour slot on radio and a music video shoot. The indie music scene in the Capital has been restricted to hubs in Hauz Khas village and one of performance in Hard Rock Cafe. But in a fresh initiative, the big band battle gives these rockers the opportunity to get their talent in front of others and earn some good prizes as they fight to win. The competition has witnessed brilliant participation so far. Head over. Show them some love!DETAILWhere: Cafe 27, Kailash Colony Market When: 27 April, 9 pm onwardslast_img read more

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Ragas unleashed

first_imgShujaat Husain Khan is renowned North Indian classical musicians of his generation. His musical pedigree extends seven generations. Khan’s musical career began at the age of three when he began practising on a specially made small sitar. By the age of six, he was recognised as a child prodigy and began giving public performances. Audiences around the world are captivated by his unique style of Sitar Playing his exceptional voice, and his intuitive and spontaneous approach to rhythm.He is the son and disciple of the great sitarist Ustad Vilayat Khan, his grandfather, Ustad Inayat Khan, his great Grand Father Ustad Imdad Khan, and his great great grandfather, Ustad Sahebdad Khan, were all leading artists of their respective generations.The event is organised by Gunjan Foundation and all the proceedings will go for welfare of  underprivileged kids.last_img read more

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