BC Oil and Gas Commission warns Coastal GasLink over pipeline construction

first_imgCoastal GasLink is building a natural gas pipeline from northeastern British Columbia to a liquefied natural gas export facility at Kitimat.On Thursday, the provincial government said it is undertaking a process with the Office of the Wet’suwet’en focused on the First Nation’s title, rights, laws and traditional governance throughout their territory.Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs oppose Coastal GasLink’s $40-billion project, which led to the arrests of 14 people at a blockade last month. VANCOUVER, B.C. – The B.C. Oil and Gas Commission says Coastal GasLink must submit a notice of construction at least 48 hours before it starts work under its permit to build a pipeline that is opposed by some members of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation.The commission has warned the Calgary-based company after it received complaints from the Office of the Wet’suwet’en who alleged that Coastal GasLink engaged in construction without an archaeological impact assessment and also destroyed traplines and tents.A letter from the commission dated Thursday says Coastal GasLink didn’t submit the required notification on Jan. 22.last_img read more

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Indias industrial growth slows to 17 in January

first_imgNew Delhi: Industrial output growth stood at 1.7 per cent in January on account of slowdown in the manufacturing sector. Factory output as measured in terms of the Index of Industrial Production (IIP) had grown by 7.5 per cent in January 2018. During April-January 2018-19, industrial output grew at 4.4 per cent as against 4.1 per cent in the same period previous fiscal, according to the data released by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) on Tuesday.last_img

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Smriti Irani files papers from Amethi takes on Rahul Gandhi

first_imgAmethi: Union minister Smriti Irani Thursday filed her nomination papers from Amethi, pitting herself against Congress president Rahul Gandhi who has won thrice from the Lok Sabha constituency regarded as Gandhi family pocket borough.Irani filed her papers after a road show, which followed a similar route taken by the one organised by the Congress when Rahul Gandhi filed his own nomination papers here on Wednesday.last_img

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Foodies to avail perks of Gourmet Passport

first_imgDineout – India’s largest dining out and restaurant tech solutions company launched its premium membership program Gourmet Passport, in Kolkata, on April 16. The service was launched by Ankit Mehrotra, CEO, Dineout and Rocky Mohan, Founder and Mentor, Gourmet Passport and a renowned food columnist in India.Gourmet Passport by Dineout is a subscription based premium membership program that offers unbeatable value to diners with its incredible Buy 1 Get 1 offer at 1000+ top restaurants across India. It enables dining at top restaurants more accessible to food connoisseurs who are looking for a great dining experience and at the same time enjoying unmatched savings of up to 50% on their dining bills. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainDineout has partnered with more than 100 restaurants across Kolkata for Gourmet Passport including the city’s luxury and fine dining restaurants and five star hotels. Some of its most exclusive partner restaurants are Pa Pa Ya, Ping’s Cafe Orient, JW Kitchen and The Salt House among others, where Kolkata’s foodies can enjoy the privileges of their Gourmet passport subscription. “Our expansion into Kolkata is a part of our commitment to meet the growing demands of our consumers. Gourmet Passport is a premium membership program that caters to evolving taste of Indian foodies and has a membership base of close to 260K members. We look forward to enhancing the gastronomic experiences of Kolkatans by bringing them the most exclusive dining options across the city”, said Ankit Mehrotra, CEO and Co-founder, Dineout. Expressing his thoughts on the launch, Rocky Mohan, Founder and Mentor, Gourmet Passport said that, “People of the City of Joy love to dine out and want to experiment with their food choices. Gourmet passport is a tailor-made product for food connoisseurs who are looking to discover premium dining experiences at best of the restaurants.”last_img read more

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Dhoni liked my version of helicopter shot says Hardik

first_imgNew Delhi: Hardik Pandya has already emulated M S Dhoni’s signature helicopter shot and the Mumbai Indians all-rounder says the veteran keeper-batsman liked his version of the innovative stroke. Pandya has looked in ominous form this IPL, scoring 218 runs at a strike rate of 194.64 in nine matches. He used the shot to good effect against speedster Kagiso Rabada in their game against Delhi Capital Thursday night. The 25-year-old smashed 32 off 15 balls to power Mumbai Indians to 168 for five, a total which Delhi Capitals found too stiff to chase, going down by 40 runs. His inning comprised two boundaries and three massive sixes, including the helicopter shot — a stroke made famous by Dhoni. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhIt was in the second ball of the 20th over when Hardik had played that shot, sending a Rabada delivery across the ropes between long-on and deep mid-wicket position. The all-rounder had played the helicopter shot in front of Dhoni during a game against Chennai Super Kings (CSK), which Mumbai won by 37 runs at the Wankhede. “I never thought I would play the helicopter shot in a game. I’ve been practising that in the nets. I went to Dhoni’s room and asked him if he liked my version of the helicopter shot. He said it was good,” said Pandya. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced laterAdjudged Man of the Match for his crucial innings, Hardik said he has been hitting the ball well. “Even I was telling myself that I don’t think I’ve ever hit the ball better. I have been working hard in the nets and it has been coming off well for me,” he said. “I like to keep the basics straight, even in the death if you keep your shape and hope for bowlers to miss, you can hit hard. “I am using my brain well, reading the wicket well in this season. I have five more games to go and then the play-offs, and I hope to keep going like this through the season.” Agencieslast_img read more

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PM did nothing for water scarce Bundelkhand Akhilesh

first_imgJhansi (UP): Samajwadi Party president Akhilesh Yadav Friday accused Prime Minister Narendra Modi of doing nothing for the “thirsty” Bundelkhand region of the state. The SP chief also dubbed Yogi Adityanath as “baba chief minister” and said that till yesterday he had faith in ‘babas’ but after non-fulfilment of promises by UP government, he was not sure. Addressing an election rally here, Yadav said, “Sometime ago the prime minister had come here and told a story about Kutch region of Gujarat which faced water problem and said life there has changed…the reality (here) is that he has done nothing for thirsty Bundelkhand”. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ “Have you all forgotten about promises made in 2014 elections…I want to ask the people of Jhansi and nearby places as to what change has come in your lives in the past five years,” he asked. Taking a dig at local MP Uma Bharti, who is not in poll fray this time, Yadav said ,”Remember she headed the department related to water…she had responsibility of Ganga cleaning…had claimed she will do, God knows what, if the Ganga was not cleaned…but there is no water in Bundelkhand…will have to go elsewhere for drowning…she did not have courage to face people of Jhansi.” Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&K Referring to Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath, Akhilesh said ,”Our state has baba chief minister…when the baba chief minister had come for the first time before you he had talked about Bundelkhand Expressway and Metro station in Jhansi.” “Till yesterday, we had full faith in babas but don’t know if it will be so now … you people tell me where is Metro station, I also want to sit in the Metro,” he said adding, the baba chief minister knows nothing about roads and expressways. The former chief minister said the then SP government had given its share meant for development works to Jhansi but the Centre has yet to fulfil its responsibility.last_img read more

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US acting in bad faith says Kim

first_imgVladivostok (Russia): Kim Jong Un has accused the US of acting in “bad faith” in talks on its nuclear arsenal, North Korean state media said Friday as he left Russia following his first summit with President Vladimir Putin. Kim’s armoured train departed the Far Eastern port city of Vladivostok a day after talks that saw Putin back the North’s need for “security guarantees” in its standoff with the United States. The official Korean Central News Agency reported that Kim told Putin the US had adopted a “unilateral attitude in bad faith” at a summit with US President Donald Trump two months ago in Hanoi. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US”Peace and security on the Korean peninsula will entirely depend on the US future attitude, and the DPRK will gird itself for every possible situation,” Kim was quoted as saying. The Kim-Trump summit broke down in late February without a deal, after cash-strapped Pyongyang demanded immediate relief from sanctions but the two sides disagreed over what the North was prepared to give up in return. Russia has called for the sanctions to be eased, while the US has accused it of trying to help Pyongyang evade some of the measures — accusations Moscow denies. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsJust a week ago, Pyongyang demanded the removal of US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from the stalled nuclear talks, accusing him of derailing the process. On Thursday, Putin emerged from the meeting saying that like Washington, Moscow supported efforts to reduce tensions and prevent nuclear conflicts. But he also insisted that the North needed “guarantees of its security, the preservation of its sovereignty”. It was “what the North has been saying all along” said Kim Keun-sik, professor of North Korean Studies at Kyungnam University, adding that Putin’s support for Pyongyang’s stance was the “biggest prize” Kim won in Vladivostok. Putin flew on to another summit in Beijing the same day, while Kim stayed in Vladivostok and had been due to take part in a series of cultural events. But the mercurial North Korean kept officials in suspense about his post-summit plans. A wreath-laying ceremony was delayed by two hours on Friday morning, with an honour guard kept waiting and the red carpet rolled up. Kim eventually showed up and the wreath was laid. Solemn music played as he stood, hat in hand wearing a black double-breasted waistcoat. Russian media had reported that Kim would be visiting the city’s aquarium and seeing a ballet, but the visit was apparently cut short. Kim instead turned up at the train station in the afternoon and, after a final departure ceremony with a military band, boarded his train and left around 3:30 pm (0530 GMT).last_img read more

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Morocco Pedophile of Marrakech Sentenced to Two Years in Prison

Casablanca- The pedophile caught red handed in the act of molesting a 10-year old boy has been sentenced to two years in jail.One week after the pedophile’s arrest, the Criminal Court of Marrakech found him guilty of the charges and sentenced the accused to two years imprisonment and a fine of 10,000 dirhams ($1,200) as restitution for the family.According to Yabiladi.com, Najia Adib, President of the association known as “Touche pas à mes enfants” said in a phone interview that this meager punishment “is a shame for the children, the associations, for the justice and whole Morocco”. Although, the sentence was imposed in accordance with Article 484 of the Penal Code which punishes anyone who commits an indecent assault against a minor, many people are not satisfied with the convicted pedophile’s deprivation of liberty in prison for only 2 to 5 years.For many, the sentence is simply not punitive enough. Many associations and citizens have voiced their outrage through social media, in order to pressure for changes.Edited by Elisabeth Myers read more

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Morocco Improves Its Trade Balance

Rabat – Morocco’s trade deficit has narrowed to 20.51 billion Dirhams by the end of February against 32.64 billion dirhams a year earlier, latest figures from the Exchange Office have revealed. Imports decreased by 15.2 per cent moving from 63.18 billion dirhams to 53.56 billion Dirhams.The decrease in imports was mainly due to the falling oil prices which also led to a decline in the country’s imports of energy (93.8% of the total decline of imports). The import-export ratio has reached 61.7% against 48.3% by the end of February, the Office said. The change is also due to the 8.2% increase in exports.Exports increased 33.04 billion Dirhams against 30.54 billion Dirhams during the same period last year.The performance in exports originates from the increase in sales of phosphates and derivatives (20.4), the automotive sector (+MAD 10,1) and those of agriculture and Agri-food (10.4%).10 MAD = 0.99 USD read more

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At Least 100000 People Attend Muhammed Alis Funeral

By Lee KainoelaniRabat – Boxing legend, Muhammed Ali, has been laid to rest in his hometown in the state of Kentucky, U.S.A., according to Al Jazeera.Ali died last week at the age of 74. The funeral procession followed was attended by tens of thousands of fans. At least 100,000 people lined the streets to say their final goodbyes to Ali, according to the Associated Press. Ali’s private burial ceremony, on Friday at Louisville’s Cave Hill Cemetery, was followed by a memorial. Many world leaders attended the private burial, including former US president Bill Clinton.As the interfaith service went about, a crowd of up to 15,000 people burst into applause, chanting, “Ali! Ali!” when a Muslim religious leader welcomed the audience to “the home of the people’s champ”.In his tribute, Clinton said Ali “is truly a free man of faith”.Lonnie Ali, widow of the legend, said her husband was “proof that adversity can make you stronger”, growing up in a segregated country.Pastor of a Louisville church, Kevin Cosby, said Ali “dared to love America’s most unloved race”, referring to African-Americans.People lined the streets, throwing flowers, and shouting, “Ali! Ali!”, as the hearse carrying his body left the funeral home, while others carried banners and photos of Ali.Lawrence Montgomery, a former neighbor of Ali, said that he has “mixed emotions”, knowing that Ali, who was suffering from the debilitating Parkinson’s disease for decades, is no longer in pain, according to Al Jazeera.“He was a marvelous young man. Very cordial and playful,” Montgomery said, recalling that as a child Ali already wanted to be a boxer.The funeral procession took place on Muhammed Ali Boulevard, and ended with a private burial ceremony before the public memorial service at the KFC Yum! Center, a sports arena in Louisville, Kentucky.Actor Will Smith, who played the three-time heavyweight world champion in the film “Ali”, helped carry the coffin with former heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis, and family members.US President Barack Obama was not able to attend the memorial service because of his daughter’s high school graduation, but one of his closest aides, Valerie Jarrett, read a letter on his behalf.Many prominent leaders, including King Abdullah II of Jordan, Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and International Olympic Committee President, Thomas Bach were expected to be in attendance on Friday. Former Ali opponents George Foreman and Larry Holmes were also expected to be in attendance.A Muslim prayer service in Louisville was held on Thursday, drawing thousands of mourners, including Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.Ali joined the Nation of Islam sect in 1964, changing his name from Cassius Clay to Muhammed Ali. He later left that sect to practice Sunni Islam. read more

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CAN 2017 Omar El Kadouri Replaces Injured Nordin Amrabat

Rabat – Morocco’s coach Hervé Renard has reportedly invited SSC Napoli’s midfielder, Omar El Kadouri, to replace Morocco’s Nordin Amrabat to participate in the 2017 Africa Cup of Nations (CAN 2017), which is set to take place from January 14 to February 5 in Gabon, the Moroccan Football Federation (FRMF) said on Saturday.This decision follows the injury of 29-year-old Amrabat in the second half of last Sunday’s Watford vs. Tottenham game in the Premier League, which resulted  in a 4-1 score. Following Amrabat’s medical examination, it was decided he would not be able to play in the CAN.Last week, Renard unveiled the name of Amrabat as one of the of 23 players who would play at the CAN. He eventually substituted him with 26-year-old Morocco-Belgian El Kadouri, who made his professional debut with Morocco’s national team in 2013. The Moroccan national team is in the Group C category, which also includes Côte D’Ivoire, Togo and the Democratic Republic of Congo.Morocco’s first scheduled match against the Democratic Republic of Congo will take place on January 16. Its second match will be against Togo on January 20 and its third will be against Côte D’Ivoire on January 24. read more

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Egyptian Doctor Kills Wife 3 Children on New Years Eve

Rabat – Egyptian police found four slaughtered bodies belonging to the same family in their apartment in Kafr El Sheikh, 134 km north of Cairo.Local police found the bodies of the wife and her daughter on the ground while the other two children’s bodies were slaughtered in their room, in the early hours of Tuesday. An Egyptian doctor confessed he committed the murder of his wife, also a doctor, and three children aged 8, 6 and 4, respectively. The 42-year old doctor said he had disputes with his wife, which caused him to “lose his temper and commit the murder.”The police arrested the suspect for further investigation.According to local media, the doctor said he strangled his wife with a “curtain rope” and stabbed her with a knife until he made sure she was dead before he stabbed his three children. He then seized his wife’s jewelry in an attempt to mislead police into believing it was a robbery crime. read more

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Religious Tolerance and Security Reforms Have Made Morocco a Bulwark against

Rabat – Amidst widening security and social concerns over the return of ISIS and other terrorist network-affiliated Moroccan nationals, Moroccan authorities are confident about the country’s preparedness to prevent future events of the magnitude of the 2003 Casablanca and 2011 Marrakesh bombings.Since the April 2011 Marrakesh terror strike, Morocco’s modernized and upgraded security system has established the kingdom as a bulwark against radicalization and organized crime, BCIJ (Central Bureau of Judiciary Investigations) director, Abdelhak Khiame, told French magazine Valeurs Actuelles in an interview published on June 14. The success of Morocco’s anti-terrorist model, Khiame elaborated, lies in an “anticipatory philosophy” that deals with terrorism at its very core.Despite separatist grievances in the south and some recent—though sporadic—political upheavals, the North African country still carries its so-called “exceptionalité Marocaine” (Moroccan exception) reputation: a bastion of security and peace in a troubled neighborhood. Although the idea of the Moroccan exception is also said to entail  Morocco as a cultural bridge, home to striking social-cultural diversities, the notion has been slightly altered in recent years. The shift has placed a particular emphasis on the country’s brand of tolerant and difference-accommodating Islam, as a factor of stability and social cohesion during and after the events of the Arab Spring.But how did this come about? How, after being shaken to its core by the terrorist strikes in 2003 and 2011, has Morocco managed to establish itself as an inspiration for other nations fighting against terrorism and radical ideologies? Why is the Moroccan anti-terrorism experience an example worth emulating?The BCJI director claimed that Morocco did not just want to fight terrorism after the 2011 strikes; the country also had “to deconstruct radicalization” in order to both limit the appeal of ideology-linked violence but also identify those most susceptible to fall prey to it.“Although it is premature to claim victory now, radicalization has drastically declined in Morocco in recent months,” he said, explaining that there now is an established network of government-sponsored experts who identify and intervene in “high risk areas.” The experts include sociologists, psychologists, Islamic law specialists, and Ulemmas (Islamic scholars) who cooperate to promote a version of moderate and tolerant Islam. “These experts also intervene in prisons to persuade terrorists to review their ideas on the meaning of jihad,” Khiame further said, hinting at another successful feature of Morocco’s robust anti-terrorism model: deradicalization. Successfully de-radicalized former terrorists are also sometimes relied upon to participate in awareness-raising campaigns in “fragile and vulnerable places.”The effective coupling of theological re-orientation and security reforms has thus been a crucial ingredient of Morocco’s anti-terrorist apparatus. Investing in state-sponsored IslamOn the religious front, the Rabita Mohammedia of Oulemas (Mohammedia House of Scholars) is leading a strenuous battle against radical and monolithic interpretations of the Quran and Islamic tenets. With more than 30 online platforms at its disposal, it disseminates books, video recordings, cassettes, and even animes whose main objective is to prevent the proliferation of radical Islamism.The body is made of experts from various academic backgrounds committed to “de-coding and deconstructing religious radicalism.” They first identify the ideological terrains that terrorist are most likely to exploit—Arab Unity, religious binarisms (Islamic world vs. others), name-calling piety, etc. Once they identify the rhetoric and vulnerable populations most susceptible  to such appeals, they then devise a counter-rhetoric designed to “immunize” fragile populations not priorly exposed to radical rhetoric, in addition to “de-radicalizing” those with previous  exposure to “simplistic pan-Islamist narratives.”“There are no self-proclaimed imams in Morocco. That is illegal,” other governmental sources told Valeurs Actuelles, as they further explained that everything is done to ensure that the country’s 45,000 practicing imams uphold and echo the pluralist core of Morocco’s official Islam in their Friday sermons. “Mosques that deviate are rapidly identified, and steep punishment follows.” A new generation of imamsEqually crucial on the ideological and religious front is Morocco’s tutelage of a new generation of imams, trained both in traditional theological sciences and “modern” courses in social sciences and the humanities. At the Mohamed VI institute for Imams, courses include sociology, philosophy, psychology, communication sciences, etc., and imams are instructed to value debates and critical thinking.Since its inception in 2006, the institute has attracted candidates from other African countries, due to the  Moroccan government’s extension of scholarships to candidates from countries like Guinea, Niger, Mali, Ivory Coast, and Nigeria. Scholarships include everything, from on-site accommodations, free courses, and pocket money. “This is to prevent external influences,” said a religious instructor, well aware of the financial factor in feeding the ranks of radical Islamism.The success of the institute has also attracted the attention of some non-African governments, with France agreeing to a partnership in 2015. France now sends on a yearly basis dozens of Imam Students to be trained in the Moroccan tradition of Islam. This year, for example, the Institute hosted 50 French nationals, of whom 10 were girls. Of the inclusion of female students in the Institute’s program, one instructor said: “It is the best way to show our openness and effectively fight against extremists who are annoyed by such a model.”Modernized anti-terrorist unitsTo supplement the ideological success of its anti-terrorism, Morocco has also heavily invested in its intelligence and elite police units, creating sophisticated networks of cooperation and intelligence sharing between the country’s top anti-terrorist specialized units. The BCIJ, the perfect embodiment of Morocco’s specialized anti-terrorist units, has often been described as the “Moroccan FBI,” an indication of the body’s high standards and commendable achievements in dealing with terrorist threats. It a special police made up of 400 detectives and 700 field agents, highly trained and equipped to root out   the various forms of domestic and transnational terrorism. The BCIJ works in collaboration with other sub-departments and security sub-divisions under the commands of the Interior Ministry, therefore creating a vast interconnected and independent hierarchy of anti-terrorist units. BCIJ operatives have neutralized 815 terrorist since 2015, in addition to dismantling 53 terrorist cells from 2015 to April 2018.“We anticipate terrorist strikes,” said BCIJ director Khiame, adding: “We receive intelligence from all agencies working under DGST (General Directorate of Territorial Surveillance). All tasks are divided and this gives us ample time to gather intelligence and intervene in time to stop potential terrorists.” read more

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Amnesty International Reports Global Executions Fell 31 in 2018

Rabat – Global executions fell by 31% to the lowest figure in at least a decade, Amnesty International reports in its 2018 review of the death penalty worldwide. The review, published Tuesday, assesses all recorded executions worldwide, excluding China.Without accounting for China, the estimated number of executions in 2018 was 690. This marks a dramatic decrease from 2017 which saw 993 executions.China is the world’s top executioner with estimated execution figures in the thousands. But, as the executions in China are a state secret, the government never officially releases data. After China, the most executions took place in Iran, Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, and Iraq. With at least 253 in Iran, 149 in Saudi Arabia, at least 85 in Vietnam, and at least 52 in Iraq, the four countries claim 78% of all reported executions.  While Iran still reports the highest number of executions, the country saw a staggering 50% decrease after executing more than 500 people in 2017. Amnesty attributes the reduction to changes in the country’s anti-narcotic laws.Read Also: Justice Minister: Morocco is Taking Steps Toward Ending Death PenaltyA number of other countries known for high numbers of executions, such as Iraq, Pakistan, and Somalia, also saw their numbers decrease in 2018.In December 2018, 121 countries at the UN General Assembly voted to support a global moratorium on the death penalty. Only 35 countries voted against. Morocco was among the countries that abstained. “The dramatic global fall in executions proves that even the most unlikely countries are starting to change their ways and realize the death penalty is not the answer,” said Amnesty International’s Secretary General Kumi Naidoo.However, not all of the report was positive. Thailand joined Botswana, Sudan, and Taiwan in resuming imposing the death penalty, holding the country’s first execution since 2009. Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena also announced he would resume executions for the first time in 40 years. Sirisena even posted an advertisement in February seeking executioners.   By the end of 2018, 106 countries had abolished the death penalty for all crimes and 142 had abolished the death penalty in practice or law. But, instances of people being sentenced to death increased to 19,336.Although Morocco has the death penalty and had at least 90 people on death row in 2018, it reported no executions. Amnesty noted that Morocco was among the 29 countries which recorded commutations or pardons of death sentences in 2018. The last execution in Morocco was that of Mohamed Mustapha Tabit, convicted of hundreds of counts of assault and rape, in 1993. Naidoo implored countries around the world to end the practice: “To all the countries that still resort to the death penalty, I challenge you to act boldly and put a stop to this abhorrent punishment now.” read more

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Parents need to plan carefully if they are going to help their

OTTAWA — Buying a home is a big step for anyone and experts say that parents looking to help their children need to make sure it is affordable and that their children are ready for the change.Chris Catliff, president and chief executive of BlueShore Financial, says his bank’s seminars for parents looking to help their kids buy a house are always packed with mums and dads wanting to learn how they can help.He says parents first need to ask themselves if they can help without compromising their own financial security.“When you downsize your home and there is a lot of equity in it, that frees up capital that often is used for funding kids either first-time buy or move-up buy,” he said.But Catliff says you need to consider your own needs for that money and other savings and that may include long-term care in later years.Once you figure out what you can afford, parents can help their children buy their first home in a number of different ways.The most straightforward is to gift the money to your child, although Catliff says there are risks associated with it such as what may happen to the value of your gift if your child separates from their spouse or partner.Instead of gifting the money, he suggests you could structure it as a loan that you could in the future forgive if you want, perhaps as part of your estate planning.Parents could also act as a guarantor for a child on the loan, a move that would reduce the risk a lender faces and allow the child to obtain a better rate.Other options could be to buy a property and rent it to your child as an alternative or co-ownership, where you and your child live together and share ownership.Nathalie Weiner, a district vice-president at TD Bank in Ottawa, says a survey done by the bank found that one in four baby boomers are helping their children or grandchildren financially.“If you’re going to help out your child with a down payment, whether it is by form of a loan or a donation or a co-signer of a mortgage, you have to make sure that actually fits into your financial plan,” she said.Weiner said the cost of becoming a homeowner isn’t just the price of the home and it is important that your child is ready to deal with those costs too.“It’s expensive owning a home. It’s not the same as renting,” she said.“You really have to sit down, calculate it and make sure you can afford it.”Weiner said picking the right way to help your child buy a house, whether it is a gift, loan or other way, is about striking a balance with your own financial plan.Catliff says parents looking to lend or give the money also need to plan where they money will come from.If you’re selling an investment that has risen significantly to make your gift, you may be faced with a large tax bill if you don’t have other losses that you can use to offset the gains come tax time.Buying a home is a big step and Catliff says parents who want to help their children need to be sure their child is ready to become a homeowner.He says parents want to give a helping hand, but it can be highly emotional and you can run the risk of hurting your relationship with your children.“It’s really important to plan it and get good financial advice,” he said. Craig Wong, The Canadian Press read more

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Trump wields presidential power on pipeline energy projects

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is eager to jump-start the stalled Keystone XL oil pipeline and other energy projects, and he’s taken action to assert executive power over pipelines and such infrastructure.He’s issued a new permit for Keystone — and insists it’s an exercise of presidential authority that’s not subject to judicial review.And Trump has signed an order clarifying that the president alone has authority to issue permits for cross-border projects such as pipelines. A separate executive order makes it harder for states to block pipelines and other energy projects on the basis of environmental concerns.Taken together, the actions are a broad assertion of presidential authority that reverses more than 50 years of practice.Matthew Daly, The Associated Press read more

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AS FAR Fan Dies in Clash with Wydad Supporter

Rabat – A Royal Armed Forces Sportive Association (AS FAR) supporter died on Tuesday, September 24, after falling from the roof of a van transporting fans. Football fans had been in Casablanca for a match between AS FAR and Wydad Athletic Club (WAC).The match took place on Tuesday at Mohammed V Stadium in Casablanca at 8 p.m.The van was reportedly intercepted by Wydadi fans on its way back to Rabat at Lahraouiyine, Mediouna province. According to local authorities in Lahraouiyine, Wydadi fans threw stones at the AS FAR fans resulting in clashes.Traffic was disrupted as a result of clashes. Public forces intervened to restore order.Read also: Morocco Hosts Training Session on Video Assistant RefereeDuring the clashes, 5 people sustained injuries. Authorities transferred the injured fans to the regional hospital in Mediouna. Police arrested 22 people.Authorities have launched an investigation to determine the circumstances of the incident. Further arrests may be carried out.WAC faced AS FAR in the qualification match to the round of 8 of the Moroccan Throne Cup. WAC lost 3-1 to AS FAR. read more

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Everything is in front of us Cryptocurrency spurs Quebec regional economy

MAGOG, Que. — Emiliano Grodzki moves his right hand across the front of a series of small, rectangular machines, each fitted with a fan blowing warm air inside a former metal factory in Quebec’s Eastern Townships.Grodzki and the rest of the Bitfarms team modified the building to house two giant opposing walls of shelves holding thousands of powerful computing systems built for a single purpose: mining for digital currency.Known as hashing, the hunt for cryptocurrency is essentially an exhaustive attempt by a computer to solve a mathematical problem. Every second, each computer in Bitfarms’ factory in Magog, Que., conducts 13.5 trillion attempts at solving a math problem. Grodzki, 42, an entrepreneur from Argentina and Bitfarms’ chief strategy officer, stops his hand in front of one machine that is unlike the others: It’s blowing cold air. “This one is not hashing,” he says.Bitfarms’ machines are solving math problems in order to collect or mine Bitcoin, the world’s most famous digital currency. Companies have sprouted all over the world in an attempt to cash in on the cryptocurrency industry. But Bitfarms stands out.The Montreal-area company is trying to set itself apart as much by its infrastructure and vertically integrated business model as for its attempt to reduce the social stigma associated with the industry’s voracious energy usage.Since its inception in November 2017, Bitfarms has been rushing to retrofit factories in Quebec regions emptied out by the decline of the province’s manufacturing industries. The company leases a former Tupperware plant in Cowansville, an old carpet factory in Farnham and an ex-cocoa storage facility in St-Hyacinthe, all to mine cryptocurrency.And it is currently turning the former Sher-Wood hockey stick factory it bought in Sherbrooke into a fifth mining operation.Key to the company’s success is securing a stable, reliable — and relatively inexpensive — energy source. That’s where Quebec comes in, with its abundant, renewable and comparatively cheap hydroelectricity. Hydro-Quebec recently designated 668 megawatts for the growing cryptocurrency sector, more than is consumed by the province’s conventional mining industry.But Bitfarms recognizes it also needs to partner with local communities and convince them they aren’t trying to suck as much power as possible, make a quick buck and leave.The company recently signed an electricity agreement with Sherbrooke city council that is serving as a model for how towns across the province can make money partnering with players in this new industry.“We have a long-term mentality,” said Pierre-Luc Quimper, the 35-year-old co-founder and president of Bitfarms, who started his first website-hosting company at 14 in his New Brunswick hometown. “We want to be long-term partners.”Bitcoin began in 2009, and its creator is unknown. Every time a Bitcoin is bought and sold online, the transaction is recorded in a public, electronic ledger.The technology behind the ledger is called blockchain, which is composed of a series of linked “blocks” that each contain up to one megabyte worth of transaction data.Every time a block of transactions is closed, a complex mathematical problem is created. The hashing machines located in Bitfarms’ four factories are in competition with all the other hashing computers around the world to solve the problem.The first computer to come up with the winning number is authorized to create a new block in the chain, in which more Bitcoin transactions can be recorded.The winning computer is also awarded a set amount of Bitcoin, which can be transferred into hard currency or used to buy anything from food to homes.Bitfarms’ factories house at least 16,500 hashing machines between them. Together, they conduct 220 quadrillion attempts every second to solve the single math problem created when a block of Bitcoin transactions reaches capacity.Hydro-Quebec, the provincial utility, helped the Bitfarms team find locations around the province for mining operations. Then the City of Sherbrooke came knocking with a novel idea for the industry.Cities across Quebec purchase enough electricity from Hydro-Quebec to satisfy peak demands, most often during the dead of winter. But for much of the rest of the year, the energy grids have surplus electricity, and the provincial government has been pushing municipalities to come up with ways to sell the extra power, said Christian Laprise, director of Sherbrooke’s municipal power utility.The deal inked with Bitfarms secures the company 98 megawatts of electricity from Sherbrooke. But Bitfarms will have to reduce operations and use less energy during peak moments of the year when the grid is being taxed by residents.A couple of years ago, Laprise had no idea what Bitcoin and blockchain were, but now he thinks the technology can help develop the digital economy in smaller cities in the province.“It can be very volatile,” Laprise said, referring to the market price of cryptocurrencies, “but according to the research I’ve done, it’s pretty unanimous that blockchain is a system of the future.”Laprise said he hoped companies like Bitfarms diversify “and that they are sustainable over the long-term.”Bitfarms says its long-term goal is to expand into other applications of blockchain, but at the moment it’s concentrating on building its mining infrastructure.Toward the end of 2017, the price of Bitcoin exploded, jumping from about $6,700 in September 2017 to an all-time high of roughly $26,500 per coin, before dropping rapidly in early 2018. One Bitcoin is currently priced at roughly $8,500.In 2018, Bitfarms earned US$33.8 million in revenue and a gross profit of US$10.9 million, representing a 32-per-cent profit margin. But due to the massive drop in Bitcoin’s price over that period, the value of its mining equipment declined significantly, resulting in an US$18-million operating loss.Back in Magog, Grodzki said the broken hashing machine blowing out cold air would be repaired by the company’s technicians at its laboratory in St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Que., south of Montreal. The company’s program department created and manages software that tracks the performance of each computer. Their four factories — five when the Sherbrooke operation is operational — run on an electrical system maintained by Volta electrique, a wholly owned subsidiary.Quimper says he remembers what it felt like when he was 10 years old discovering the internet. He said the blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies are at the same stage now as the internet was in 1997.“For the last four years, I’ve had the same feeling I had when I was 10 years old,” he said. “Everything is in front of us.”Giuseppe Valiante, The Canadian Press read more

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Cyprus problem requires a local solution to succeed UN envoy stresses

No plan to resolve the Cyprus problem will be successful in the long run unless it is a local one in which every person in both communities feels their voice has been heard and they understand the ramifications of what is proposed, the head of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) said today.Michael Møller, who is also the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Cyprus, called on Cypriots to step up, engage in dialogue and “bring home new ideas and inspiration for action” as part of the debate over the Mediterranean island’s future.Michael Møller, who is also the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Cyprus, called on Cypriots to step up, engage in dialogue and “bring home new ideas and inspiration for action” as part of the debate over the Mediterranean island’s future.Speaking at the International Civil Society Fair, held in Nicosia, Mr. Møller noted that an inter-communal survey released last week by UNFICYP found that both Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots supported the creation of more contacts between the two communities, but were also wary of any non-Cypriot attempts in this area that could be perceived as interfering or meddling, instead of assisting or facilitating.“Understanding and peace is best achieved by those who already know each other,” Mr. Møller said. “It is seldom sustainable if imposed by outsiders. And the population of this island instinctively understands this.”He therefore called on Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots to become part of a more active and less passive civil society that can offer grassroots ideas about solutions that might then have more chance of success in the longer-term.“I am convinced that no solution to the problem of Cyprus will be sustainable or take sufficiently strong root unless every Cypriot has the conviction that he or she truly understands all its components and ramifications and, more importantly, feels that their voice has been heard and that they have had a say in shaping that solution. The Cyprus problem must have a Cypriot solution.” 3 May 2007No plan to resolve the Cyprus problem will be successful in the long run unless it is a local one in which every person in both communities feels their voice has been heard and they understand the ramifications of what is proposed, the head of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) said today. read more

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Sierra Leone UNbacked court increases sentences for two former militia leaders

The United Nations-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) today increased the sentences of two former leaders of a pro-Government militia who were convicted last year of war crimes committed during the country’s prolonged civil war in the 1990s.The Special Court Appeals Chamber, in a majority judgment, today upheld war crimes convictions of the two men on counts of murder and cruel treatment and increased their sentences substantially. Moinina Fofana, who had been sentenced to concurrent sentences totalling six years, has now been sentenced to 15 years. Allieu Kondewa’s sentence was increased from eight to 20 years.Prosecutors at their trial last year said Mr. Fofana served as National Director of War for the pro-government militia, the Civil Defence Forces (CDF) while Mr. Kondewa acted as High Priest for the militia. During Sierra Leone’s civil war the CDF, whose members included tribally-based traditional hunters, supported the Government against rebel groups, including the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) and the Armed Forces Revolutionary Council (AFRC). Today’s judgment overturned convictions imposed by the Trial Chamber against Mr. Fofana and Mr. Kondewa for collective punishments, and against Mr. Kondewa for recruiting child soldiers. However, the Appeals Chamber, by a majority, also entered two new convictions against both men for murder and inhumane acts as crimes against humanity.The SCSL is mandated to try those bearing the greatest responsibility for serious violations of international humanitarian and Sierra Leonean law within the country’s borders since 30 November 1996. It is the second international war crimes tribunal established in Africa. 29 May 2008The United Nations-backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) today increased the sentences of two former leaders of a pro-Government militia who were convicted last year of war crimes committed during the country’s prolonged civil war in the 1990s. read more

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